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Legal Aid’s Fair Play Project Celebrates National Girls and Women in Sports Day

by Legal Aid At Work. Originally published here.

February 7, 2018 marks the 32nd Annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day, coinciding with the opening of the Winter Olympic Games on February 9, 2018. Fair Play for Girls in Sports, a project of Legal Aid at Work, celebrates by noting the amazing accomplishments of female Olympians, many of whom would not be competing but for Title IX. The 1972 law requiring gender equity in federally-funded K-12 schools, colleges, and universities paved the way for many American girls and woman to become great athletes and continues to spur educational institutions to treat girls and women equally to create a truly level playing field. 

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Working with Dolby

by Grace Patterson, Camp Reel Stories Camper. Originally published here.

This September, I had the opportunity of a lifetime mixing audio for my short film “After The Storm” with Director of Audio and Visual Production, John Loose, at Dolby studios in San Francisco. During our time at Dolby, we got to interact and experiment with state of the art sound equipment, create foley, and mix “After The Storm” in Dolby 5.1 surround sound. Along with fellow campers Sasha, Clarissa and Truly and CRS staff April and Esther, we learned many crucial lessons about sound in film. 

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Systems That Oppress Women Create Dangerous Circumstances for Girls of Color

by Holly Joshi, Co-Director at MISSSEY. Originally published in the East Bay Express here

It's time to dismantle the old-boys' networks that protect perpetrators and leave women vulnerable.

After a decade in the anti-trafficking movement, I am always surprised by the shocked reactions of others when they first learn about the prevalence of child sex trafficking locally. Disgust, anger, and a strong pull toward action I understand. The shock catches me off guard. When I find myself in discussions with the shocked, I often wonder if we are living in and experiencing the same country. As a woman of color from Oakland, I understand sex trafficking as a horrific byproduct of a society that over sexualizes, marginalizes, and oppresses entire populations of people. 

The truth I have come to understand is that there are, in fact, multiple Americas. This country presents as the land of safety, endless opportunity, and freedom for some and as a place of continuous strife, danger, and despair for many others. This country centers, caters to, coddles, and encourages the success of white, middle- and upper-class, cis-gendered men while everyone else exists on a continuum of worth and experiences America accordingly. 

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Holiday Gift Ideas to Inspire Every Girl in STEM

by Linda Kekelis, Founder and former Chief Executive Officer of Techbridge. Originally published in the Huffington Post here.

This Holiday Season Make Room in Your Heart for Someone Else’s Daughter

This year when you shop for a gift for the girls in your family, take a moment to think about other girls who might benefit from your generosity. Toys, computer games, books, and enrichment experiences can introduce girls to the wonders of STEM. For girls who don’t have STEM role models in their family, these gifts might be the catalyst that help them imagine a career in computer science or a future in engineering.

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In Solidarity We Rise

by Andrea Zamora, Member of Alliance for Girls' Young Women's Leadership Board & Student.

Through my involvement with Alliance for Girls and being part of the Girls Leadership Team, I was invited to attend a conference for three days in Washington D.C. The conference called “In Solidarity We Rise: Healing, Opportunity and Justice for Girls,” was the first conference that I ever attended. It was also my first time ever being in an airplane. It was definitely a new experience and I didn’t know what to expect. I also wasn’t too sure how a conference was set up or what we were suppose to do. Throughout the whole time, I was excited about attending my first conference but I was scared of my workshop and having to present in front of others. I tend to get really nervous about saying something wrong and messing up in front of an audience. During the conference, we were able to present our work on revamping Oakland Unified School District’s sexual harassment policy and the process that it all came about from conducting research to the Girls Leadership Team to working together and transforming the policy. I felt relieved when we were done presenting and got good feedback. Along with my workshop, were other organization presenting and teaching others about their work and things they can implement if they wanted to do something alike. 

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Meet Dahlia, the Oakland Lacrosse Player of the Month 

by Dahlia, Lacrosse Player at Oakland Lacrosse Club. Originally published here.

Oakland Lacrosse launched a strategic initiative to implement our holistic program at every Oakland public middle school. Dahlia joined our program about four weeks ago. Last week we had the opportunity to interview Dahlia about her OLC experience:

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Not Only a Pipeline: Schools as Carceral Sites

by Connie Wun, Founder/Director of Transformative Research: An Institute for Research and Social Transformation. Originally published here.

In this article, I argue that schools operate as multilayered sites that do more than funnel students into prison or prime them for incarceration. Schools are part and parcel of a US logic of punitive carcerality, positioning Black and Brown bodies under constant observation and scrutiny through the school’s architecture, policies, and practices. I examine the relation-ship that this logic has to Black girls and their experiences with school discipline, including their resistance to the conditions of schools as carceral sites.

Drawing from Black feminist theory (Richie, 1996) and critical prison studies (Rodriguez, 2006), I collected data via participant observations and in-depth interviews at Foundations High School, located in northern California.1,2 Based upon a qualitative study of 20 Black and Latinx girls and their experiences with school discipline, this paper focuses on three girls whose narratives exemplify the experiences that they and their peers have with school discipline and punishment.

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The Power of Your Vulnerability

by Caitlin D'aprano, CEO of Willpowered Woman. Originally published here.

Vulnerability is about being honest about our past life events that have shaped who we are and what we may be feeling in the moment. Personally, admitting how much I want something and going for it makes me feel vulnerable.

Let me put it in to context. Five years ago I booked a one-way flight from Melbourne to London. I went there to start a shoe business and to work in the fashion industry. I landed amazing jobs with the Headquarters of Burberry, Harrods and REISS. I ensured that I got different jobs to gain experience for my shoe business. After I gathered enough experience, I ventured to do the shoe business alongside my own sales and business consultancy. I worked hard to make these things a success, but then came “my quarter life crisis”. I started to question everything, I felt like my life had no meaning, so I started searching. 

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Let's Welcome Alena, our Impact Development Director 

by Alena, Impact Development Director of Willpowered Woman. Originally published here.

My name is Alena and I’m from Russia. I joined Willpowered Woman as Impact Development Director last month. I have more than 5 years of experience in nonprofit organizations and have a diploma in social psychology and economics. Unfortunately, intimate partner abuse is paid very little attention in my Country. There aren’t any crisis centers or women’s shelter to help survivors. Recently, a law was passed by our Government that decriminalizes intimate partner violence. If a woman involves the Police for the first time, a man will not suffer any punishment. Growing up in Russia, women are brought up under different stereotypes: women should cook, clean the house and care for children, but men need to rest after work; the message is frequently communicated that if a woman isn’t married and doesn’t have children, she will be unhappy and have a sad life. There are a lot of women in Russia who think it’s normal if their husband hurts or humiliates them.

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Teaching Your Child To Learn From Failure: 4 Steps To Success

by Rebecca Temsen, guest blogger for Dr. Carol. Originally published here.

The old adage holds true: We learn from our mistakes. Making mistakes is especially how children learn. Unfortunately, too many kids (and even some adults) have never learned the value of making a mistake. I plead guilty too.

Too many fail to realize successful people find new routes to their goals and they don’t let setbacks derail them. Succeeding ultimately depends on sticking with their efforts and not letting setbacks hold them down, especially with kids. 

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#MediaMondayTip: A Girl-Power Reading List For Middle Schoolers

by Clare Reynders, MediaGirls editorial volunteer. Originally published on Girls Leadership's blog here.

 

There are so many good books for middle schoolers with strong female protagonists out there to choose from! Luckily, MEDIAGIRLS has you covered. With help from Robin Brenner, the Teen Librarian at the Brookline Public Library in Brookline, MA, we’ve compiled a list of books that center around strong, smart, powerful female characters. As an extra bonus, they’re all by female authors, giving us a genuine perspective on each story.

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It's time to give all-female founding teams a head start

by Eileen Gittins, CEO of Bossygrl. Originally published here.

It was worse than I thought, but also better than I imagined.

First, the "worse than I thought" part. In the spring of last year, I was invited to speak at a publishing industry conference in New York City. As often happens, I was approached by a group of people who wanted to meet and ask questions after the talk. But this time, it was different. This time I was surrounded by swarm of young women who had obviously come to the event together.

They were on a mission.




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Teen Stealing Alcohol From Parents—And What You Can Do About It

by Dr. Carol Langlois, originally published on Your Teen Magazine here

Teen Caught Stealing Alcohol From Parents

Dear Your Teen:

My 17-year-old stole alcohol from our home to drink with her friends. This is the second time she’s done this. How should I respond?




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"If you can see it, you can be it."

by Sasha Williams, student at Carondelet High School and member of Black Girls Code. 

“My name is Sasha Williams. I am 16 years old, and attend Carondelet High School in Concord, California. I realized my passion for technology and arts at a young age. I was introduced to “Black Girls Code” when I was 12 years old. I learned that coding was fun and could open a world of possibilities. I could combine my love for the arts and technology. I would like to become CEO of my own tech company or write and direct movies. Since joining Black Girls Code I have participated in a number of Hackathons and mobile App workshops. In 2013 my team won second place in the Ignite Global Fund for Women’s Hackathon mobile app “Ohana.” My team competed against teams around the world. I look forward to attending university with a major in Computer Science.”

Last Fall Sasha Williams (Class of 2019) was selected for the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) Leaders of the Fast Track (LOFT) 2016 Video Game Innovation Fellowship sponsored by the Hispanic Heritage Foundation, in Washington D.C. The ESA LOFT Video Game Innovation Fellowship serves as platform for top game developers by identifying and promoting the top 20 minority innovators (15-25 years old) who can create video games or mobile apps that will focus on new, technology-based approaches to address local and global social issues. 

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Alliance for Girls' Conference: Together We Rise

by Maren Frye, student at Berkeley High School and intern at YWCA Berkeley/Oakland

 

I went to the Alliance for Girls’ Conference: Together We Rise as part of a school club, Berkeley High School Stop Harassing, which aims to stop the culture of sexual harassment at our high school and support victims. It was a truly amazing experience. While there, I heard some of the most intelligent, inspiring, all-around amazing women I had ever met speak about their experiences of sexism and discrimination, and how they overcame those obstacles. One talk in particular stood out to me; when the president of EMILY’s List, Stephanie Schriock, presented about the need for women in public office and the work EMILY’s list was doing to support them, I heard the call to action. In that moment, I felt so inspired to use my power as a woman to help all of us around the country that I made a decision—I was going to run for president when I grew up! While I don’t think that’s probable, I do think I want to go into public office now (just a lesser one). It’s so important for women to be part of the institutions that make changes that affect them; we can’t let men decide what’s best for us, WE need to do that. And while I was at the conference, I learned about an opportunity to do just that. I picked up a flyer about the programs at the Berkeley YWCA and knew immediately that this was a chance to make the changes that had seemed abstract and distant in my head, but were now tangible.

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Dr. Carol talks Empowerment, Self-esteem and Women in Tech

by Dr. Carol, originally published on her blog here

Listen to this recent interview with Dr. Carol where she talks about empowerment, self-esteem and women in tech: https://soundcloud.com/breakingintostartups/59-dr-carol-langlois-how-self-esteem-empowerment-are-changing-the-ratio-through-hackbright

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Cheering Her On: A Little Sister Prepares for New Adventures Ahead

by Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Bay Area, originally published on their blog here

Fall is fast approaching which means many students are readying themselves for big life transitions such as going off to college. Although it’s exciting, it’s also a time of significant life choices and major change. No one knows that better than Little Sister, Kashari, who has worked hard to get to this stage of life.

In her senior year of high school, Kashari held an internship with the District Attorney’s Justice Academy, kept her grades up, and snagged a Scholarship honor in the process. She also applied to colleges, resulting in quite a few options to choose from! Kashari credits her Big Sister, Julie, with keeping her focused while helping her to be open minded about different ways of thinking and approaching new situations.

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Real Talk: On Empowering Girls & Women

by Emily Frost, Founder of Love Your Nature, originally published on Youth Passageways blog here


Take a moment to remember your teen years. Think back to your first sexual encounters. Remember your body, your environment, the people you were with. Paint the picture. What did it feel like? How do you feel now, trying to remember? 

If you’re a woman reading this, you’re probably connecting to some awkward if not terrible memories. Most of us had mostly not-great sex before we were 20, have been coerced, assaulted, raped, or don’t remember our first sexual experiences because of substance use. Any of this sounding familiar? You are not alone. In fact, you’re a lot like almost every other woman on this planet. Perhaps you are man reading this, with daughters, sisters, or women in your life you love dearly, who already share or may come to know these same experiences. 

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My Time at Tech Trek

by Catherine Zhou, student and alum of Tech Trek sponsored by AAUW San Francisco. 

To start off I would like to thank you and the rest of the San Francisco AAUW Branch for giving me this chance to attend the best camp ever! Even though I didn't get into Tech Trek at Stanford, I'm really lucky to have gotten in at all. 

On the way to Fresno I was really nervous, I thought to myself did I bring too much stuff? Will I make any friends? Will anyone think I'm really weird? Will I be homesick? I was just so nervous! But when I got there I had a sigh of relief, everybody seemed nice and I don't think I was the only nervous one. 

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No Elephant in the Room at Women's Tech Confab

by Roberta Guise, Founder and President of FemResources. A version of this article appeared in Women Who Code blog here.

The conference floor at Twitter headquarters in San Francisco transformed into a magnet to aspiring and future software engineers this past April. The mostly-women attendees had gathered for a day-long tech-fest of sharing, learning, and networking at the Women Who Code CONNECT 2017 conference.

As founder and president of Alliance member FemResources, a startup nonprofit to advance women’s careers in technology and engineering and move the needle towards gender equality in tech, I attended to glean deeper insights into the needs, wants and aspirations of women seeking a technical career. I also happened to be “citizen journalist” for the day.

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